Taranaki-based film explores impact of oil and gas industry


Teacher and climate activist Sarah Roberts will feature in documentary A Fracking Tour of Taranaki.

Supplied/Stuff

Teacher and climate activist Sarah Roberts will feature in documentary A Fracking Tour of Taranaki.

A documentary examining the impact of Taranaki’s onshore oil and gas industry, and whether the country is on track to hit its emissions targets, will be released this month.

But A Fracking Tour of Taranaki, which follows local teacher and climate activist Sarah Roberts as she travels around the region in her van, does not include comment from industry group Energy Resources Aotearoa.

John Carnegie, Energy Resources Aotearoa’s chief executive, was interviewed for the film but did not make the final cut, said co-producer Jean Bell.

Instead, the film would include Taranaki Regional Council environment quality director Gary Bedford.

READ MORE:
* Get to know our content partners
* Postcards from Aotearoa: Why you should visit the Wairoa Māori Film Festival
* Someday Stories 2019: Tamāloa

Hearing his part had been chopped was news for Carnegie.

“It’s surprising and disappointing to hear a documentary about our industry doesn’t include comment from the industry itself,” he said.

“In the interests of fairness and balance, we can only hope they have some other industry representative featured. Without that, it would be a very biased and one-sided film.”

In the film, Roberts and Emily Bailey, of Parihaka, speak of their vision for New Zealand’s energy production.

Supplied/Stuff

In the film, Roberts and Emily Bailey, of Parihaka, speak of their vision for New Zealand’s energy production.

The film also sees a stop at Parihaka, where iwi members who have resisted the industry share their vision for New Zealand’s energy production, and it also looks at the legacy of former Prime Minister Robert Muldoon’s Think Big projects.

Director Ethan Alderson-Hughes, of Auckland, said the film’s kaupapa (purpose) was accountability and education.

The film is available to watch online through Radio New Zealand, Stuff, and Māori Television from September 20 as part of Someday Stories Series 5, a collection of documentaries on sustainability by young Aotearoa filmmakers.

Someday Stories is produced by Connected Media with support from NZ On Air, Te Māngai Pāho and the New Zealand Film Commission and in association with Stuff, Māori Television on Demand, and Radio NZ.



Source link

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

%d bloggers like this: